Nik's Technology Blog

Travels through programming, networks, and computers

How to get the BBC iPlayer on your Nintendo Wii

You can now get the BBC iPlayer on the Nintendo Wii games console!

Before you can start watching programmes broadcast on the BBC over the last 7 days you'll need to connect your Wii console to the Internet (see instructions below) and download the Opera web browser from the Wii Store (Which costs 500 Wii points or about 3.50 Pounds Sterling).

Before you can buy Wii points to purchase the Opera web browser you'll first need to register online at www.nintendo-europe.com and "link" your Wii console to the Nintendo account you just created online, Nintendo have a guide on how to link your Wii Shop Channel Account to your Club Nintendo Account.

Once you've linked your account to your Wii console you need to go to the Wii Shop accessed from the Wii Home Menu on the console and purchase (by using a credit or debit card to buy some Wii points) and download the "Internet Channel".

Once downloaded and installed you're ready to go!

From the Wii Home Menu select "Internet Channel" and navigate to www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer, you can then use your Wii remote to zoom, pan and scroll around the web and the iPlayer.

You can read more info about the BBC iPlayer on the Wii console at BBC Internet Blog.


To connect your Nintendo Wii console to the Internet with Wi-Fi follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Wii home menu
  2. Select "Wii options" on the bottom left
  3. Click on "Wii settings" on the right
  4. Click the right arrow
  5. Select Internet
  6. Click "Connection Settings"
  7. Select "Connection 1"
  8. Choose "Wireless Connection"
  9. Select "Search for Access Point"
  10. Click "Ok"
  11. You should be presented with a list of local wireless routers, select your wireless router from the list
  12. If your wireless router is secure, you'll be prompted to enter your Wi-Fi password
  13. Click to save your connection settings
  14. Click "Ok"
  15. The Wii will now test your connection and then prompt you to perform a system update, click "Yes"
  16. Return to the Wii menu when prompted

BBC Panorama programme 'Wi-Fi: A Health Warning' was unfair

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) have said that a Panorama television programme they aired back in May 2007 concerning the possible health effects of WiFi, or wireless internet was unfair, and that it was presented in such a way that it was deemed by some viewers as misleading and in some cases pure scaremongering.
The episode followed a call by the Health Protection Agency pressing for a formal investigation back in April 2007.

If you missed it you can watch the programme here, Wi-Fi: a warning signal. Due to the amount of complains sent in by viewers of the programme the BBC interviewed the journalist behind the controversial programme on NewsWatch below.

Worried about potential health effects of wireless networks? Six easy steps to setting up an alternative

You may have read the scare stories about wireless networks in the press recently, and you may be wondering what you can do to avoid the potential health effects and still have a home which is fairly wire-free.
You may also have recently been given a free wireless router from your ISP.
Sky broadband, AOL broadband, BT broadband, Pipex, they nearly all bundle a wireless router in with your broadband contract these days, so what do you do?

Upgrade to a Powerline Network

Whether you believe the scare stories or not. I'll show you how you can still keep your wireless router but without the potential side-effects.

The answer? Upgrade to a Powerline network. A lesser known technology that uses your mains electrical wiring to distribute your broadband connection, which will allow you to connect a computer anywhere you have a power socket, and turn off the wireless signals so you don't have to worry about "WiFi smog".

Six Steps to Avoid Using WiFi

  1. Purchase at least 2 Powerline wall-plugged adapters (Netgear, Devolo and Dlink all have Powerline products). This is enough to connect one computer to the Internet.
  2. Plug 1 adapter into a wall socket near the wireless router, and connect your existing router to the Powerline adapter using an Ethernet patch cable.
  3. Plug the other Powerline adapter into a wall socket near the computer you want to connect to the Internet and connect your computer to the second Powerline adapter using an Ethernet patch cable.
  4. You should now be online!
  5. Now you'll need to log-in to your wireless router console, usually via a web browser (see your router manual for details) and disable the wireless access point on the router. See the screen-shot below for a visual, obviously your router console may look completely different, but usually the instruction manuals are fairly good.
  6. You can now surf the web anywhere in your home wire-free and without using WiFi!

Still confused? Check out Devolo's Powerline flash presentation, which explains all about Powerline networking simply and with animation.

Wi-Fi hacking - 2 Cautioned by UK Police

For the first time in the UK two people have been cautioned by police for accessing wireless broadband connections without permission. Both cases were detected by suspicious behaviour in cars parked in the vicinity and not through electronic means.
Both people were warned for dishonestly obtaining electronic telecoms with intent to avoid payment.

Most wireless routers come without Wi-Fi encryption turned on by default, leaving unsavvy users open to this kind of abuse.
Most broadband ISP terms and conditions state that you cannot share your broadband connection with your neighbours etc, therefore all related activity on your connection is connected with you.
Due to recent laws, ISPs have to keep records of your Internet activity for a number of years. If authorised people are accessing your connection and using it for illegal practices then how would you prove your innocence?

Recently news has come out that anti-piracy companies are monitoring P2P traffic, using a modified version of Shareaza they are automatically sending your IP to your ISP demanding your details if it detects that pirated material is being downloaded. Some people have questioned whether an IP is enough evidence to connect a person with a crime, especially considering these cases of drive-by Wi-Fi hacking.

Media Center Extender - Network Congestion

Media Extenders are particularly useful for streaming video to your TV. Here in the UK the only available Media Extenders you can purchase come in the form of an Xbox 360.

I have been using my Xbox 360 to stream movies stored on my main Media Center PC to my living room over a wireless network (802.11g).

Occasionally I get a "Network Congestion" message appear in the top-right-hand corner, which comes accompanied with a small amount of picture judder/stutter. It's still highly watchable, just a little annoying. Information is available to help you improve your wireless performance; however the crux of the issue is the wireless standards. The Xbox wireless networking adapter supports the following WLAN standards 802.11a, 802.11b and 802.11g. The 802.11n standard has not been ratified by the IEEE yet, but when it comes around it will improve the throughput of data.

The Xbox 360 wireless networking adapter doesn't support any draft version of the 802.11n standard however, so we are stuck with 802.11a,b,g, unless we run an ethernet cable from the router to the Xbox, but that kind of defeats the object, doesn't it?

Microsoft recommends the following:

  • Only have 1 wireless route between your PC -> Router -> Media Extender
  • Use 802.11a standard as it works at 5GHz compared to the congested 2.4GHz channel
  • Use a router designed for Windows XP Media Center Edition

I fairly certain 802.11a is not legal in the UK, can anyone confirm this?

Wireless LAN Security Vulnerabilities

Since I last wrote about WLAN Security shortly after buying a Netgear Wireless router, I thought I'd write about improving your wireless network over-and-above that of what WEP (Wireless Equivalent Privacy) offers.

In 2001 two universities in the US, Maryland and UC Berkeley published separate studies into the inherent flaws with WEP encryption.

This had, until recently put many corporations off the idea of WLANs. After all there are tools freely available that can decipher the WEP encryption keys used on a network.

So what technology can we use to improve WLAN security?

Ever since the flaws in WEP were discovered the IEEE and the Wi-Fi Alliance have been busy trying to ratify a new standard in WLAN encryption. Known as 802.11i or WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) it is meant to be a software upgrade that is designed to address all known WEP vulnerabilities.

WPA uses an IEEE standard called 802.1X with Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP). Basically TKIP uses a dynamic key rather than the static one used in WEP, with TKIP a new key is generated every 10000 packets. TKIP also checks packets to make sure they haven't been altered by an intermediary.

Even though the upgrade to WPA was supposed to be a software (Firmware) upgrade it's still down to the hardware manufacturer to continue supporting it's hardware. Looking on the Netgear site it looks like my hardware (Netgear DG824M) won't be getting new firmware to upgrade the security from WEP to WPA.

Securing a home wireless router

Searching For WiFi Hotspots

When you're out and about and need to check your email with your WiFi enabled laptop, wouldn't it be great if you didn't have to turn your laptop on to see if you are within range of a wireless hotspot?

I've come across a couple of solutions to that problem recently.

The first solution is to buy a 23 GBP PCTel WiFi Seeker. It's a small keychain based device that can detect IEEE 802.11b or 802.11g wireless networks within 300ft.

The other solution is a service by totalhotspots.com. You simply text HOTSPOT to their text number and they tell you the nearest wireless hotspot. The service costs 1 GBP per successful search.

PCTel WiFi Seeker

Novell Suse Linux 9.2 Pro Supports Bluetooth and WLAN

I saw an advert in PC Pro claiming that the new Novell Suse Linux, version 9.2 Professional has improved support for mobile devices.

If you've read my previous post concerning Linux and WLAN you'll probably have guessed my reaction to this news.

I checked out suse.com, which is in the process of being moved to the Novell site, and read the product description with baited breath.

It seems that YaST (Suse's installer of choice) has been updated to include better support for WLAN, Bluetooth and IrDA.

It reads...

Improved WLAN support and configuration with YaST (including Centrino).

New YaST configuration modules for IrDA and Bluetooth.

Bluetooth support with autodetection for synchronization with Bluetooth cell phones and handhelds.

It's all very exciting stuff and for around 56 GBP it's competitively priced considering it comes bundled with over 1000 open-source software products.

http://www.novell.com/products/linuxprofessional/

Wireless and Linux

While I'm on the subject of wireless networks (WLAN) I'm still waiting for Linux to catch up and support more Wi-Fi devices so I can start to use my Linux box to the full. As yet I'm still unable to get Mandrake or Red Hat to work with my MA111 out of the box or using linux-wlan.

If anyone knows of any PCI or USB solutions that are compatible and available in the UK please contact me via my contact page.

http://www.linux-wlan.org/

XP SP2 and Netgear MA111

I installed XP Service Pack 2 last night for the second time after rolling it back previously.

The first time I installed it I couldn't get my Netgear MAlll wireless 802.11b USB device to work, I've since installed it on various other XP machines and with each install i've had different issues with the device.

I learned fairly early on that the supplied Netgear software wouldn't work under SP2, instead you have to opt for Windows XP wireless configuration, which incidentally has been slightly improved since SP1. Having said that it's still not perfect, since you have to enter your WEP in manually rather than use a password to create it like the Netgear software.

There are also issues with driver installation when you do a fresh install of XP and patch it with SP2 before installing the MA111.

The joy of computing :)

http://www.netgear.com/products/details/MA111.php