Nik's Technology Blog

Travels through programming, networks, and computers

Where does Apple TV leave the Xbox 360?

Apple have just released Apple TV, essentially a device used to wirelessly bridge the gap between iTunes on your computer (Mac, PC) and your TV set in your living room.

Apple added video downloads to the iTunes service a while back, by getting several Hollywood studios on-board. These videos have so far only be available to watch on your computer screen or on your iPod video. Apple TV aims to fix this, by allowing your iTunes library to be wirelessly streamed to your HDTV.

Xbox 360's Media Capabilities

Microsoft on the other hand have similar strategies on invading peoples' living rooms with digital content, theirs though, is in the form of the Xbox 360, which as well as being a high definition games machine is also a very capable Media Center Extender.

As a Media Center Extender it wirelessly streams content from Windows Media Center, or Windows Vista (Home Premium and Ultimate editions) computers. If you don't have a Media Center edition of Windows you can still stream your music, pictures and just recently WMV videos too from the Xbox console using Windows Media Connect.

So How Do Apple TV and Xbox 360 Compare?

Ok, here's a matrix comparision table between Apple TV and the Xbox 360, so you can make your own mind up.

Feature
Apple TV
Xbox 360
HD Games Machine
No
Yes
Stream Audio
Yes
Yes
Stream Video
Yes
Yes
Stream Photos
Yes
Yes
Component Video
Yes
Yes
HDMI
Yes
No
Audio Out
Yes (optical and RCA analogue)
Yes (optical and RCA analogue)
Ethernet connection
Yes
Yes
Wireless capabilities
Yes (built-in) (pre-n)
Yes (sold separately) (a, b, g)
HD Resolution capabilities
1080i, 720p, 576p, or 480p 1080p, 1080i, 720p, 480i,480p
DVD player
No
Yes
HD DVD player
No
Yes (sold separately)
iTunes compatibility
Yes
No
Remote control
Yes
Yes (sold separately)
HD drive
40GB
20GB (premium package only, not needed for streaming)
Video formats supported
H.264 and protected H.264 (from iTunes Store): Up to 5 Mbps, Progressive Main Profile (CAVLC) with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps (maximum resolution: 1280 by 720 pixels at 24 fps, 960 by 540 pixels at 30 fps

iTunes Store purchased video: 320 by 240 pixels or 640 by 480 pixels

MPEG-4: Up to 3 Mbps, Simple Profile with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps (maximum resolution: 720 by 432 pixels at 30 fps)
WMV only, although a Windows 3rd party app called Transcode360 will allow most other formats to be streamed
Audio formats supported
AAC, protected AAC (from iTunes Store), MP3, MP3 VBR, Apple Lossless, AIFF, WAV MP3, WMA, un-encoded AAC, CD, DVD audio

Windows Home Server

I signed up to test the new Windows Home Server Public Beta a while back and received an invitation to download and review it.

Like a lot of people I am frequently running out of storage space on my machines and needing to upgrade. I am also fairly concerned about data backups too, so much so that I upgraded my main machine a while back to include a SATA RAID 1 mirror for my core data over 2 x 320GB drives.

Most people however don't have the need or knowledge to set up a decent backup or redundancy solution, so Windows Home Server when purchased installed on a piece of purposely designed hardware should fill this gap in the market.

When I get a spare few minutes I'll download the DVD and test on an un-used machine. I'm particularly interested in the usability of the software since it will mostly likely be bought by and used by people who are not particularly technically minded.

From what I've heard it does not include Media Center (since it's a headless OS), but it features Windows Media Connect, so I'll be able to stream my music and video straight to my XBOX 360 without having to have my main machine running.